IRS Withholding Calculator

The IRS encourages everyone to use the Withholding Calculator to perform a quick “paycheck checkup.”  This is even more important this year because of recent changes to the tax law for 2018.

The Calculator helps you identify your tax withholding to make sure you have the right amount of tax withheld from your paycheck at work.

There are several reasons to check your withholding:

  • Checking your withholding can help protect against having too little tax withheld and facing an unexpected tax bill or penalty at tax time next year.
  • At the same time, with the average refund topping $2,800, you may prefer to have less tax withheld up front and receive more in your paychecks.

If you are an employee, the Withholding Calculator helps you determine whether you need to give your employer a new Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate. You can use your results from the Calculator to help fill out the form and adjust your income tax withholding.

Plan Ahead: Tips For Using This Program

The Calculator will ask you to estimate values of your 2018 income, the number of children you will claim for the Child Tax Credit and Earned Income Tax Credit, and other items that will affect your 2018 taxes. This process will take a few minutes.

  • Gather your most recent pay stubs.
  • Have your most recent income tax return handy; a copy of your completed Form 1040 will help you estimate your 2018 income and other characteristics and speed the process.
  • Keep in mind that the Calculator’s results will only be as accurate as the information you provide.  If your circumstances change during the year, come back to this Calculator to make sure that your withholding is still correct.
  • The Withholding Calculator does not ask you to provide sensitive personally-identifiable information like your name, Social Security number, address or bank account numbers. The IRS does not save or record the information you enter on the Calculator.

IMPORTANT NOTE: This Withholding Calculator works for most taxpayers. People with more complex tax situations should use the instructions in Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax, expected to be updated in early spring. This includes taxpayers who owe self-employment tax, alternative minimum tax, the tax on unearned income of dependents or certain other taxes, and people with long-term capital gains or qualified dividends.

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Withholding Calculator

To Change Your Withholding:

  • Use your results from this Calculator to help you complete a new Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate, and
  • Submit the completed Form to your employer as soon as possible. Withholding takes place throughout the year, so it’s better to take this step as soon as possible.

Special Note for 2019:  If you follow the recommendations at the end of this Calculator and change your withholding for 2018, the IRS reminds you to be sure to recheck your withholding at the start of 2019. This is especially important if you reduce your withholding sometime during 2018. A mid-year withholding change in 2018 may have a different full-year impact in 2019. So if you do not file a new Form W-4 for 2019, your withholding might be higher or lower than you intend. To help protect against having too little withheld in 2019, we encourage checking your withholding again early in 2019.

If you have additional questions about your withholding, consult your employer or tax advisor.

IRS Can Help Taxpayers Get Form W-2

Most taxpayers got their Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, by the end of January. Taxpayers need their W-2s to file an accurate tax returns, as the form shows an employee’s income and taxes withheld for the year.
Taxpayers who haven’t received their W-2 by the end of February should:
• Contact their Employer. Taxpayers should ask their current or former employer for a copy of their W-2. Be sure the employer has the correct address.
• Call the IRS. Taxpayers who are unable to get a copy from their employer by the end of February may call the IRS at 1-800-829-1040 for a substitute W-2. The IRS will send a letter to the employer on taxpayers’ behalf. When they call, taxpayers need their:
• Name, address, Social Security number and phone number.
• Employer’s name, address and phone number.
• Employment dates.
• Estimate of wages and federal income tax withheld in 2017. Use a final pay stub for these amounts.
• File on Time. Taxpayers should file their tax return by April 17, 2018. If they still haven’t received their W-2, they should use Form 4852, Substitute for Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement. They should estimate their wages and taxes withheld as best as possible. To request more time to file, they should use Form 4868, Application for Automatic Extension of Time to File. Taxpayers can also e-file a request for more time using IRS Free File. Taxpayers should remember that an extension of time to file isn’t an extension of time to pay taxes owed. Taxpayers can also get an extension by paying all or part of their estimated income tax due, and indicate that the payment is for an extension using Direct Pay, the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System, or a credit or debit card. This way, the taxpayer won’t have to file a separate extension form and will receive a confirmation number for their records.
• Correct a Tax Return, if Necessary. Taxpayers may need to correct their tax return. This could happen if they get a missing W-2 after they file. If the tax information on the W-2 is different from what they first reported, they may need to file an amended tax return. Use Form 1040X, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, to make the change.
All taxpayers should keep a copy of their tax return. Taxpayers using a software product for the first time may need their Adjusted Gross Income from last year’s tax return to verify their identity. Taxpayers can learn more about how to verify their identity and electronically sign tax returns at Validating Your Electronically Filed Tax Return.

Feb 22, 2018 – IRS Funding Information

The IRS releases refunds each weekday throughout the year. We provide the percentage of refunds that have not yet been funded by the IRS. We update these funding statistics at approximately 2:00pm eastern each weekday throughout the year.

As of today, the estimated percentage of refunds not yet released by the IRS are:

– for returns filed 01/17 – 01/22, approximately 10% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 01/23 – 02/05, approximately 15% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 02/06 – 02/07, approximately 80% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 02/08 – 02/12, approximately 90% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 02/13 – 02/15, approximately 95% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 02/16 and beyond, the IRS has released very few refunds.

    Feb 21, 2018 – IRS Funding Information

The IRS releases refunds each weekday throughout the year. We provide the percentage of refunds that have not yet been funded by the IRS. We update these funding statistics at approximately 2:00pm eastern each weekday throughout the year.

As of today, the estimated percentage of refunds not yet released by the IRS are:

– for returns filed 01/17 – 01/21, approximately 10% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 01/22 – 01/30, approximately 15% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 01/31 – 02/06, approximately 80% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 02/07 – 02/12, approximately 90% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 02/13 and beyond, the IRS has released very few refunds.

Taxpayers Can Choose to Itemize or Take Standard Deduction for Tax Year 2017

Most taxpayers claim the standard deduction when they file their federal tax return. However, some filers may be able to lower their tax bill by itemizing when they file their 2017 tax return. Before choosing to take the standard deduction or itemize, it’s a good idea to figure deductions using both methods and choose the method with the most benefit. The IRS offers the following tips to help taxpayers decide:
• Figure Itemized Deductions. Taxpayers who itemize basically add up the year’s deductible expenses to arrive at their total deduction. Deductions include: o Home mortgage interest
• State and local income taxes or sales taxes – but not both
• Real estate and personal property taxes
• Gifts to charities
• Casualty or theft losses
• Unreimbursed medical and employee business expenses above certain amounts
• Know the Standard Deduction. For taxpayers who don’t itemize, the standard deduction for 2017 depends on their filing status: o Single — $6,350
• Married Filing Jointly — $12,700
• Head of Household — $9,350
• Married Filing Separately — $6,350
• Qualifying Widow(er) — $12,700
If a taxpayer is 65 or older, or blind, the standard deduction is more, but may be limited if another person claims that taxpayer as a dependent.
• Use IRS Free File. Taxpayers who earned $66,000 or less in 2017 qualify to use free, brand-name software to prepare and file their federal tax returns electronically. IRS Free File software helps taxpayers determine if they should itemize. Taxpayers who can’t use Free File have other e-file options.
• Check the Exceptions. There are some situations where the law doesn’t allow people to claim the standard deduction. This rule applies to married taxpayers who file separate returns, and either spouse itemizes. In this case, the standard deduction is zero and they should itemize any deductions.
• Use IRS.gov Tool. Use the Interactive Tax Assistant on IRS.gov. There are several tools that can help people determine whether to itemize or take the standard deduction.
• File the Right Forms. For taxpayers to itemize their deductions, they must file Form 1040 and Schedule A, Itemized Deductions. Filers can take the standard deduction on Forms 1040, 1040A or 1040EZ.
More Information:
• Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information
• Publication 17
• Taxpayer Bill of Rights: #3, The Right to Pay No More than the Correct Amount of Tax
IRS YouTube Videos:
Interactive Tax Assistant – English | ASL

Feb 15, 2018 – IRS Funding Information

The IRS releases refunds each weekday throughout the year. We provide the percentage of refunds that have not yet been funded by the IRS. We update these funding statistics at approximately 2:00pm eastern each weekday throughout the year.

As of today, the estimated percentage of refunds not yet released by the IRS are:

– for returns filed 01/17 – 02/09, approximately 95% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 02/10 and beyond, the IRS has released very few refunds.

    Feb 14, 2018 – IRS Funding Information

The IRS releases refunds each weekday throughout the year. We provide the percentage of refunds that have not yet been funded by the IRS. We update these funding statistics at approximately 2:00pm eastern each weekday throughout the year.

As of today, the estimated percentage of refunds not yet released by the IRS are:

– for returns filed 01/17 – 02/07, approximately 95% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 02/08 and beyond, the IRS has released very few refunds.

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National Association of Tax Professionals