Payroll

Things people do during the summer that might affect their tax return next year

It’s summertime and for many people, summertime means change. Whether it’s a life change or a typical summer event, it could affect incomes taxes. Here are a few summertime activities and tips on how taxpayers should consider them during filing season.

Getting married
Newlyweds should report any name change to the Social Security Administration. They should also report an address change to the United States Postal Service, their employers, and the IRS. This will help make sure they receive documents and other items they will need to file their taxes.

Sending kids to summer day camp
Unlike overnight camps, the cost of summer day camp may count towards the child and dependent care credit.

Working part-time
While summertime and part-time workers may not earn enough to owe federal income tax, they should remember to file a return. They’ll need to file early next year to get a refund for taxes withheld from their checks this year.

Gig economy work
Taxpayers may earn summer income by providing on-demand work, services or goods, often through a digital platform like an app or website. Examples include ride sharing, delivery services and other activities. Those who do are encouraged to visit the Gig Economy Tax Center at IRS.gov to learn more about how participating in the sharing economy can affect their taxes.

Normally, employees receive a Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, from their employer to account for the summer’s work. They’ll use this to prepare their tax return. They should receive the W-2 by January 31 next year. Employees will get a W-2 even if they no longer work for the summertime employer.

Summertime workers can avoid higher tax bills and lost benefits if they know their correct status. Employers will determine whether the people who work for them are employees or independent contractors. Independent contractors aren’t subject to withholding, making them responsible for paying their own income taxes plus Social Security and Medicare taxes.

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Checking withholding can help taxpayers decide if they need to give their employer a new W-4

All taxpayers should review their federal withholding each year to make sure they’re not having too little or too much tax withheld.

Employees, retirees and self-employed individuals can use the IRS Tax Withholding Estimator to help decide if they should make a change to their withholding. This online tool guides users, step-by-step through the process of checking their withholding, and provides withholding recommendations to help aim for their desired refund amount when they file next year. Taxpayers can check with their employer to update their withholding or submit a new Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Certificate.

Adjustments to withholding
Individuals should generally increase withholding if they hold more than one job at a time or have income from sources not subject to withholding. If they don’t make any changes, they will likely owe additional tax and possibly penalties when filing their tax return.

Individuals should generally decrease their withholding if they qualify for income tax credits or deductions other than the basic standard deduction.

Either way, those who need to adjust their withholding must prepare a new Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Certificate. They need to submit the new Form W-4 to their employer as soon as possible since withholding occurs throughout the year.

Individuals who should check their withholding include those:

  • whose spouse is an employee
  • who are working two or more jobs at the same time or who only work for part of the year
  • who claim credits such as the child tax credit
  • with dependents age 17 or older
  • who itemized deductions on prior year returns
  • with high incomes and more complex tax returns
  • with large tax refunds or large tax bills for last year

Tax Withholding Estimator benefits
The IRS Tax Withholding Estimator can help taxpayers:

  • determine if they should complete a new Form W-4.
  • know what information to put on a new Form W-4.
  • save time because the tool completes the form worksheets.

Taxpayers should prepare before using the Tax Withholding Estimator by having their most recent pay statements, information for other income sources and their most recent income tax return. The tool does not ask for sensitive information such as name, Social Security number, address, or bank account numbers.

State or local withholding
Some individuals might also need to adjust their state or local withholding. They can contact their state’s department of revenue to learn more.

More information:
Video: How to Use the IRS Withholding Estimator
Tax Withholding Estimator FAQs
Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax

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Eligible Paycheck Protection Program expenses now deductible

WASHINGTON – The Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service issued guidance today allowing deductions for the payments of eligible expenses when such payments would result (or be expected to result) in the forgiveness of a loan (covered loan) under the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP).

Today’s guidance, Revenue Ruling 2021-02, reflects changes to law contained in the COVID-related Tax Relief Act of 2020, enacted as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (Act), Public Law 116-260, which was signed into law on Dec. 27, 2020.

The COVID-related Tax Relief Act of 2020 amended the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) to say that no deduction is denied, no tax attribute is reduced, and no basis increase is denied by reason of the exclusion from gross income of the forgiveness of an eligible recipient’s covered loan. This change applies for taxable years ending after March 27, 2020.

Revenue Ruling 2021-02 obsoletes Notice 2020-32 and Revenue Ruling 2020-27. This obsoleted guidance disallowed deductions for the payment of eligible expenses when the payments resulted (or could be expected to result) in forgiveness of a covered loan.

For more information about this, the COVID-related Tax Relief Act of 2020, and other tax changes, visit IRS.gov.

 

February 1 is the deadline for employers to issue and file wage statements

Employers must file Form W-2 and other wage statements by Monday, February 1, 2021. This is also the date Form W-2s are due to employees.

By law, employers are required to file copies of their Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, and Form W-3, Transmittal of Wage and Tax Statements, with the Social Security Administration by January 31. However, since January 31 falls on a Sunday in 2021, the deadline is the next business day, Monday, February 1.

Form 1099-MISC, Miscellaneous Income and Form 1099-NEC, Nonemployee Compensation, are also due to recipients on February 1, 2021, with some exceptions. Other due dates related to Form 1099 are listed in the instructions for these forms.

Timely filing helps prevent fraud.
Filing wage statements on time and without errors is beneficial to employers and the IRS. The employer avoids penalties, and the IRS has time to verify income taxpayers report on their tax returns, which helps prevent fraud.

E-file is the quickest, most accurate and convenient way to file these forms. The law requires certain filers who file 250 or more information returns for any calendar year to file electronically.

Employers should plan and prepare early.
Good preparation now can help employers avoid problems later. For instance, employers can start by verifying or updating employee information, such as:
• Names
• Addresses
• Social Security numbers
• Individual Taxpayer Identification Numbers

Employers should be sure their account information is current and active with the Social Security Administration as soon as possible. Lastly, employers should order paper Form W-2s, if needed.

Automatic extensions of time to file Form W-2s are not available. The IRS will only grant extensions for very specific reasons. For details, employers should read the instructions for Form 8809, Application for Extension of Time to File Information Returns.

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Helpful information for taxpayers on backup withholding

Taxpayers who receive certain types of income may have backup withholding deducted from these payments. Backup withholding can apply to most payments reported on certain Forms 1099 and W-2G.

Here are some facts to help taxpayers understand backup withholding.

Backup withholding is required on certain non-payroll amounts when certain conditions apply.

The payer making such payments to the payee doesn’t generally withhold taxes, and the payees report and pay taxes on this income when they file their federal tax returns. There are, however, situations when the payer is required to withhold a certain percentage of tax to make sure the IRS receives the tax due on this income.

Backup withholding is set at a specific percentage.

The current percentage is 24 percent.

Payments subject to backup withholding include:

• Interest payments
• Dividends
• Payment card and third-party network transactions
• Patronage dividends, but only if at least half the payment is in money
• Rents, profits or other gains
• Commissions, fees or other payments for work done as an independent contractor
• Payments by brokers
• Barter exchanges
• Payments by fishing boat operators, but only the part that is paid in actual money and that represents a share of the proceeds of the catch
• Royalty payments
• Gambling winnings, if not subject to gambling withholding
• Taxable grants
• Agriculture payments

Examples when the payer must deduct backup withholding:

• If a payee has not provided the payer a Taxpayer Identification Number.
– A TIN specifically identifies the payee.
– TINs include Social Security numbers, Employer Identification Numbers, Individual Taxpayer Identification Numbers and Adoption Taxpayer Identification Numbers.

• If the IRS notified the payer that the payee provided an incorrect TIN; that is the TIN does not match the name in IRS records. Payees should make sure that the payer has their correct name and TIN to avoid backup withholding.

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Local IRS Offices

York
2670 Industrial Hwy, York, PA 17402
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:30pm)
(717) 757-4977

Harrisburg
228 Walnut St, Harrisburg, PA 17101
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:00pm) (717) 777-9650

Lancaster
1720 Hempstead Rd, Lancaster, PA 17601
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:00pm)
(717) 291-1994










NATP

National Association of Tax Professionals