Announcement: ASY are Small Business Accountants that treat me like family.

Bookkeeping • Payroll • Tax Preparation • Government Correspondence

From small business to non-profit (501(c)(3))… from new business to established… we handle the numbers so you can concentrate on the business!

AS of York caters to small business owners. Because you’re in business, you need the peace of mind that working with a trusted accounting firm like ASY can provide. At ASY, our goal is to help you thrive by providing the responsive, intelligent service you need. For over 25 years we have been contributing to the success of companies just like yours through our integrity, expertise, and client focus. Let us help you succeed by delegating your accounting and tax functions to us so you can focus on what you do best.

Experience the peace of mind that comes with working with ASY… contact us today.
(717) 757-5482

We offer year round Tax Service and electronic filing for both personal, corporate, and non-profit tax returns. Setting up a new business? Have questions? We can help. We offer a no charge consultation. Are you processing your own payroll? Are you being overcharged by a big National Payroll Company? We can help! We have been processing payroll for many local and National companies for over 25 years and we’ll take care of the headache of payroll taxes for you. Contact us for a quote on our payroll service today.

We’ll count the beans… you enjoy the coffee!

Whether you’re a new client or a familiar face, feel free to use our handy Tax Organizer to get you ready for the season. Available in both Word.doc or PDF format.

Click the links below to get the status of your refund

Federal — Where is My Federal RefundWhere’s My Federal Amended Return

Pennsylvania — Where’s My PA RefundWhere is my Pa Property Tax Rebate

Have questions about how the Affordable Care Act will effect your taxes? Download the ACA Consumer Guide

Jan 29, 2015 – IRS Funding Information

The IRS releases refunds each weekday throughout the year. We provide the percentage of refunds that have not yet been funded by the IRS. We update these funding statistics at approximately 2:00pm eastern each weekday throughout the year.

As of today, the estimated percentage of refunds not yet released by the IRS are:

– for returns filed 01/12 – 01/13, approximately 55% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 01/14 – 01/16, approximately 60% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 01/17 – 01/23, approximately 65% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 01/24 – 01/24, approximately 95% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 01/25 and beyond, the IRS has released very few refunds.

If You Work, The Earned Income Tax Credit Can Work For You!

Since 1975, the Earned Income Tax Credit has helped workers with low and moderate incomes get a tax break each year. Four out of five eligible workers claim EITC, but the IRS wants everyone who is eligible to claim this credit. Here are some things you should know about this valuable credit:
• Review your eligibility. If you worked and earned under $52,427, you may qualify for EITC. If your financial or family situation has changed, you should review the EITC eligibility rules. You might qualify for EITC this year even if you didn’t in the past. If you qualify for EITC you must file a federal income tax return and claim the credit to get it. This is true even if you are not otherwise required to file a tax return. Don’t guess about your EITC eligibility. Use the EITC Assistant tool on IRS.gov. The tool helps you find out if you qualify and estimates the amount of your EITC.
• Know the rules. You need to understand the rules before you claim the EITC, to be sure you qualify. It’s important that you get this right. Here are some factors you should consider:
o Your filing status can’t be Married Filing Separately.
o You must have a Social Security number that is valid for employment for yourself, your spouse if married, and any qualifying child listed on your tax return.
o You must have earned income. Earned income includes earnings from working for someone else or working for yourself.
o You may be married or single, with or without children to qualify. If you don’t have children, you must also meet age, residency and dependency rules. If you have a child who lived with you for more than six months of 2014, the child must meet age, residency, relationship and the joint return rules to qualify.
o If you are a member of the U.S. Armed Forces serving in a combat zone, special rules apply.
• Lower your tax or get a refund. The EITC reduces your federal tax and could result in a refund. If you qualify, the credit could be worth up to $6,143. The average credit was $2,407 last year.

Choose the Right Filing Status

It’s important that you use the correct filing status when you file your tax return. Your status can affect the amount of tax you owe for the year. It may even affect whether you must file a tax return. Keep in mind that your marital status on Dec. 31 is your status for the whole tax year. Sometimes more than one filing status may apply to you. If that happens, choose the one that allows you to pay the lowest tax.
IRS e-file is the easiest and most accurate way to file your tax return. The tax software you use to e-file helps you choose the right filing status. Remember, most people can use tax software and e-file for free with IRS Free File. The free service is only available through the IRS.gov website. Just click on “Free File” on the IRS.gov home page.
Here’s a list of the five filing statuses:
1. Single. This status normally applies if you aren’t married. It applies if you are divorced or legally separated under state law.
2. Married Filing Jointly. If you’re married, you and your spouse can file a joint tax return together. If your spouse died in 2014, you often can file a joint return for that year.
3. Married Filing Separately. A married couple can choose to file two separate tax returns. This may benefit you if it results in less tax than if you file a joint tax return. It’s a good idea for you to prepare your taxes both ways before you choose. You can also use it if you want to be responsible only for your own tax.
4. Head of Household. In most cases, this status applies if you are not married, but there are some special rules. You also must have paid more than half the cost of keeping up a home for yourself and a qualifying person. Don’t choose this status by mistake. Be sure to check all the rules before you file.
5. Qualifying Widow(er) with Dependent Child. This status may apply to you if your spouse died during 2012 or 2013 and you have a dependent child. Certain other conditions also apply.
Note for same-sex married couples. In most cases, you and your spouse must use a married filing status on your federal tax return if you were legally married in a state or foreign country that recognizes same-sex marriage. That’s true even if you now live in a state that doesn’t recognize same-sex marriage. Visit IRS.gov for more information.
Visit IRS.gov and click on the “Filing” tab for help with all your federal income tax filing needs. Use the Interactive Tax Assistant tool to help you choose the right filing status. For more on this topic see Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information. Go to IRS.gov/forms to view, download or print the tax products you need.

ASY in the News: Affordable Care Act

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Affordable Care Act

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Local IRS Offices

York
2670 Industrial Hwy, York, PA 17402
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:30pm)
(717) 757-4977

Harrisburg
228 Walnut St, Harrisburg, PA 17101
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:00pm) (717) 777-9650

Lancaster
1720 Hempstead Rd, Lancaster, PA 17601
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:00pm)
(717) 291-1994