ASY are Small Business Accountants that treat me like family.

Bookkeeping • Payroll • Tax Preparation • Government Correspondence

From small business to non-profit (501(c)(3))… from new business to established… we handle the numbers so you can concentrate on the business!

AS of York caters to small business owners. Because you’re in business, you need the peace of mind that working with a trusted accounting firm like ASY can provide. At ASY, our goal is to help you thrive by providing the responsive, intelligent service you need. For over 25 years we have been contributing to the success of companies just like yours through our integrity, expertise, and client focus. Let us help you succeed by delegating your accounting and tax functions to us so you can focus on what you do best.

Experience the peace of mind that comes with working with ASY… contact us today.
(717) 757-5482

We offer year round Tax Service and electronic filing for both personal, corporate, and non-profit tax returns. Setting up a new business? Have questions? We can help. We offer a no charge consultation. Are you processing your own payroll? Are you being overcharged by a big National Payroll Company? We can help! We have been processing payroll for many local and National companies for over 25 years and we’ll take care of the headache of payroll taxes for you. Contact us for a quote on our payroll service today.

We’ll count the beans… you enjoy the coffee!

Whether you’re a new client or a familiar face, feel free to use our handy Tax Organizer to get you ready for the season. Available in both Word.doc or PDF format.

Click the links below to get the status of your refund

Federal — Where is My Federal RefundWhere’s My Federal Amended Return

Pennsylvania — Where’s My PA RefundWhere is my Pa Property Tax Rebate

Have questions about how the Affordable Care Act will effect your taxes? Download the ACA Consumer Guide

Who Will Prepare Your Tax Return?

WASHINGTON – As the start of tax filing season approaches, the Internal Revenue Service is reminding taxpayers to start thinking about who will prepare their 2016 federal tax return. The IRS will begin processing tax returns on Monday, January 23. Many software companies and tax professionals will accept and submit tax returns before the IRS systems open on January 23.
In 2016, more than 131 million individual and family tax returns were e-filed, the most accurate, safest and easiest way to file. The rest of the returns received by the IRS, numbering over 19 million, were either prepared on a computer and printed or prepared by hand then mailed.
The IRS stresses that no matter who prepares it, by signing the return, the taxpayer becomes legally responsible for the accuracy of all information included.

Employers and Coverage Providers: 11 Facts About Health Care Information Forms

Under the Affordable Care Act, insurance companies, self-insured companies, and large businesses and businesses that provide health insurance to their employees must submit information returns to the IRS and individuals reporting on health coverage.
Taxpayers can use the information on these forms when they file their tax returns to verify the months that they had minimum essential coverage and determine if they satisfied the individual shared responsibility provision of the health care law. The IRS will use the information on the statements to verify the months of the individual’s coverage.
Here is some information about the types of forms, the purpose of each, and noteworthy dates
Form 1095-C, Employer-Provided Health Insurance Offer and Coverage
• This form is filed by applicable large employers, which generally are employers with 50 or more full-time employees, including full-time equivalents. • ALEs send this form to certain employees, with information about what coverage the employer offered.
• Employers that offer health coverage referred to as “self-insured coverage” send this form to individuals they cover, with information about who was covered and when.
• This form is submitted to the IRS with Form 1094-C, Transmittal of Employer-Provided Health Insurance Offer and Coverage Information Returns.
• The deadline for filing this form with the IRS is February 28, 2017, or March 31, 2017 if filing electronically.
• The deadline for furnishing this form to the employee is March 2, 2017, which is a 30-day extension from the original due date of January 31.
Form 1095-B, Health Coverage Information Return
• This form is filed by providers of minimum essential coverage, including employers that are not applicable large employers, but who offer employer-sponsored self-insured health coverage.
• It is used to report information to covered individuals about each person enrolled in coverage – this form is sent to the person identified as the responsible individual on the form.
• This form is submitted to the IRS with Form 1094-B, Transmittal of Health Coverage Information Returns.
• The deadline for filing this form with the IRS is February 28, 2017, or March 31, 2017 if filing electronically.
• The deadline for furnishing this form to the covered individual is March 2, 2017, which is a 30-day extension from the original due date of January 31.

IRS Offers Tips on Validating Your Identity on Your Tax Return

You should always keep a copy of your tax return. It is even more important for 2017, as the Internal Revenue Service moves to strengthen its e-signature validation process.

You must use your 2015 adjusted gross income or your 2015 self-select PIN to validate your identity on your federal electronic tax return this tax season. The electronic filing PIN is no longer available as an option.

The IRS, state tax agencies and the nation’s tax industry – partners in combating identity theft -ask for your help in their efforts. Working in partnership with you, we can make a difference.

That’s why we launched a public awareness campaign that we call “Taxes. Security. Together.” We’ve also launched a series of security awareness tips that can help protect you from cybercriminals.

As part of the IRS efforts to protect taxpayers, the e-signature validation change mostly affects those taxpayers who have used tax software in the past but are changing software brands in 2017. If that’s you, learn more about how to verify your identity and electronically sign your tax return at Validating Your Electronically Filed Tax Return.

Here are a few important steps:

  1. Find a copy of your 2015 tax return; the original return filed with the IRS.
  2. Create a five-digit Self-Select PIN to serve as your electronic signature. It can be any five numbers except all zeros.
  3. If married filing jointly, each taxpayer must create a self-select PIN.
  4. Provide your date of birth when prompted
  5. Provide either your 2015 adjusted gross income or your 2015 self-select PIN as the “shared secret” between you and the IRS. Either number, along with your date of birth, will serve to help validate your identity and verify your e-signature.
  6. On your 2015 tax return, your adjusted gross income (AGI) is on line 37 of the Form 1040; line 21 on the Form 1040-A or line 4 on the Form 1040-EZ.

This change will not affect most taxpayers. For example, if you are a returning customer, your software generally will automatically populate your date of birth and “shared secret” information. Those of you who switched software products generally must enter the “shared secret” information yourself.

If you don’t have a copy of your 2015 tax return, you may be able to get a copy from your prior-year software provider. If your software account is still active, you may be able to view your 2015 federal return to find your AGI. Or, you may ask your prior-year tax preparer for a copy if you had your return prepared professionally. If those are not options, you may use a Get Transcript self-help tool on IRS.gov to get a Tax Return Transcript showing your AGI.

Use Get Transcript Online to immediately view your AGI. You must pass the Secure Access identity verification process. Select the “Tax Return Transcript” and use only the “Adjusted Gross Income” line entry.

Use Get Transcript by Mail or call 800-908-9946 if you cannot pass Secure Access and need to request a Tax Return Transcript. Please allow five to 10 days for delivery. Use only the “Adjusted Gross Income” line entry.

The IRS, state tax agencies and the tax industry joined together as the Security Summit to enact a series of initiatives to help protect you from tax-related identity theft. You can help by taking these basic steps.

To learn additional ways you can take to protect your personal and financial data, visit “Taxes. Security. Together. Also read Publication 4524, Security Awareness for Taxpayers.

IRS, Partners Urge Taxpayers to Beware of IRS Impersonations and Tax Scams

If you get a call from the “IRS” threatening you with lawsuits or jail unless you pay up immediately … Guess what? It’s a scam.

IRS impersonation and tax scams by phone, email, postal mail and text are ongoing. Criminals use more  and more creative ploys to trick taxpayers and tax preparers. Don’t be a victim.

The IRS, state tax agencies and the private-sector tax industry are asking for your help in the effort to combat identity theft and fraudulent returns. Working in partnership with you, we can make a difference.

That’s why for the second year in a row, we launched a public awareness campaign that we call “Taxes. Security. Together.” And, we’ve launched a series of security awareness tips that can help protect you from cybercriminals.

The IRS doesn’t initiate contact with taxpayers by email, text message or social media channels to request personal or financial information. This includes requests for PIN numbers, passwords or similar access information for credit cards, banks or other financial accounts.

Here are five things the scammers often do but the IRS will not do. Any one of these five things is a tell-tale sign of a scam.

The IRS will never:

  • Call to demand immediate payment, nor will the agency call about taxes owed without first having mailed you a bill.
  • Demand that you pay taxes without giving you the opportunity to question or appeal the amount they say you owe.
  • Require you to use a specific payment method for your taxes, such as a prepaid debit card.
  • Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.
  • Threaten to bring in local police or other law-enforcement groups to have you arrested for not paying.

If you get a phone call from someone claiming to be from the IRS and asking for money, here’s what you should do:

If you don’t owe taxes, or have no reason to think that you do:

  • Do not give out any information. Hang up immediately.
  • Contact TIGTA to report the call. Use their “IRS Impersonation Scam Reporting” web page. You can also call 800-366-4484.
  • Report it to the Federal Trade Commission. Use the “FTC Complaint Assistant” on FTC.gov. Please add “IRS Telephone Scam” in the notes.

If you know you owe, or think you may owe tax:

  • Call the IRS at 800-829-1040. IRS workers can help you.

Stay alert to scams that use the IRS as a lure. Tax scams can happen any time of year, not just at tax time. For more, visit “Tax Scams and Consumer Alerts” on IRS.gov.

2017 Standard Mileage Rates for Business, Medical and Moving Announced   

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today issued the 2017 optional standard mileage rates used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes.

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2017, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be:

  • 53.5 cents per mile for business miles driven, down from 54 cents for 2016
  • 17 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes, down from 19 cents for 2016
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations

The business mileage rate decreased half a cent per mile and the medical and moving expense rates each dropped 2 cents per mile from 2016. The charitable rate is set by statute and remains unchanged.   The standard mileage rate for business is based on an annual study of the fixed and variable costs of operating an automobile. The rate for medical and moving purposes is based on the variable costs.

Taxpayers always have the option of calculating the actual costs of using their vehicle rather than using the standard mileage rates.

A taxpayer may not use the business standard mileage rate for a vehicle after using any depreciation method under the Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS) or after claiming a Section 179 deduction for that vehicle. In addition, the business standard mileage rate cannot be used for more than four vehicles used simultaneously.

These and other requirements are described in Rev. Proc. 2010-51. Notice 2016-79, posted today on IRS.gov, contains the standard mileage rates, the amount a taxpayer must use in calculating reductions to basis for depreciation taken under the business standard mileage rate, and the maximum standard automobile cost that a taxpayer may use in computing the allowance under a fixed and variable rate plan.

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Local IRS Offices

York
2670 Industrial Hwy, York, PA 17402
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:30pm)
(717) 757-4977

Harrisburg
228 Walnut St, Harrisburg, PA 17101
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:00pm) (717) 777-9650

Lancaster
1720 Hempstead Rd, Lancaster, PA 17601
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:00pm)
(717) 291-1994










NATP

National Association of Tax Professionals