Announcement: ASY are Small Business Accountants that treat me like family.

Bookkeeping • Payroll • Tax Preparation • Government Correspondence

From small business to non-profit (501(c)(3))… from new business to established… we handle the numbers so you can concentrate on the business!

AS of York caters to small business owners. Because you’re in business, you need the peace of mind that working with a trusted accounting firm like ASY can provide. At ASY, our goal is to help you thrive by providing the responsive, intelligent service you need. For over 25 years we have been contributing to the success of companies just like yours through our integrity, expertise, and client focus. Let us help you succeed by delegating your accounting and tax functions to us so you can focus on what you do best.

Experience the peace of mind that comes with working with ASY… contact us today.
(717) 757-5482

We offer year round Tax Service and electronic filing for both personal, corporate, and non-profit tax returns. Setting up a new business? Have questions? We can help. We offer a no charge consultation. Are you processing your own payroll? Are you being overcharged by a big National Payroll Company? We can help! We have been processing payroll for many local and National companies for over 25 years and we’ll take care of the headache of payroll taxes for you. Contact us for a quote on our payroll service today.

We’ll count the beans… you enjoy the coffee!

Whether you’re a new client or a familiar face, feel free to use our handy Tax Organizer to get you ready for the season. Available in both Word.doc or PDF format.

Click the links below to get the status of your refund

Federal — Where is My Federal RefundWhere’s My Federal Amended Return

Pennsylvania — Where’s My PA RefundWhere is my Pa Property Tax Rebate

Have questions about how the Affordable Care Act will effect your taxes? Download the ACA Consumer Guide

May 15, 2015 – IRS Funding Information

The IRS releases refunds each weekday throughout the year. We provide the percentage of refunds that have not yet been funded by the IRS. We update these funding statistics at approximately 2:00pm eastern each weekday throughout the year.

As of today, the estimated percentage of refunds not yet released by the IRS are:

– for returns filed 03/15 and prior, most refunds have been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 03/16 – 04/10, approximately 10% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 04/11 – 04/12, approximately 15% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 04/13 – 04/14, approximately 20% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 04/15 – 04/27, approximately 25% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 04/28 – 04/30, approximately 30% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 05/01 – 05/04, approximately 35% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 05/05 – 05/05, approximately 45% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 05/06 – 05/09, approximately 65% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 05/10 – 05/10, approximately 70% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 05/11 and beyond, the IRS has released very few refunds.

May 14, 2015 – IRS Funding Information

    The IRS releases refunds each weekday throughout the year. We provide the percentage of refunds that have not yet been funded by the IRS. We update these funding statistics at approximately 2:00pm eastern each weekday throughout the year.

    As of today, the estimated percentage of refunds not yet released by the IRS are:

    – for returns filed 03/14 and prior, most refunds have been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 03/15 – 04/10, approximately 10% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 04/11 – 04/12, approximately 15% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 04/13 – 04/14, approximately 20% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 04/15 – 04/27, approximately 25% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 04/28 – 04/28, approximately 30% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 04/29 – 04/30, approximately 35% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 05/01 – 05/04, approximately 40% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 05/05 – 05/05, approximately 45% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 05/06 – 05/06, approximately 65% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 05/07 – 05/07, approximately 70% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 05/08 – 05/08, approximately 95% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 05/09 and beyond, the IRS has released very few refunds.

Apr 27, 2015 – IRS Funding Information

The IRS releases refunds each weekday throughout the year. We provide the percentage of refunds that have not yet been funded by the IRS. We update these funding statistics at approximately 2:00pm eastern each weekday throughout the year.

As of today, the estimated percentage of refunds not yet released by the IRS are:

– for returns filed 02/25 and prior, most refunds have been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 02/26 – 03/27, approximately 10% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 03/28 – 03/30, approximately 15% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 03/31 – 04/07, approximately 20% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 04/08 – 04/13, approximately 25% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 04/14 – 04/14, approximately 35% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 04/15 – 04/18, approximately 65% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 04/19 – 04/20, approximately 70% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 04/21 – 04/21, approximately 95% have not yet been released by the IRS.

– for returns filed 04/22 and beyond, the IRS has released very few refunds.

Apr 24, 2015 – IRS Funding Information

    The IRS releases refunds each weekday throughout the year. We provide the percentage of refunds that have not yet been funded by the IRS. We update these funding statistics at approximately 2:00pm eastern each weekday throughout the year.

    As of today, the estimated percentage of refunds not yet released by the IRS are:

    – for returns filed 02/22 and prior, most refunds have been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 02/23 – 03/24, approximately 10% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 03/25 – 04/07, approximately 20% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 04/08 – 04/12, approximately 25% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 04/13 – 04/13, approximately 35% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 04/14 – 04/14, approximately 40% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 04/15 – 04/15, approximately 65% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 04/16 – 04/19, approximately 70% have not yet been released by the IRS.

    – for returns filed 04/20 and beyond, the IRS has released very few refunds.

Top 10 Tips to Know if You Get a Letter from the IRS

The IRS mails millions of notices and letters to taxpayers each year. There are a variety of reasons why we might send you a notice. Here are the top 10 tips to know in case you get one.

1. Don’t panic. You often can take care of a notice simply by responding to it. The Accountants at ASY are experts in responding to ‘love letters’ from the IRS Call our office to go over the letter and we will help you navigate through the murky waters.

2. An IRS notice typically will be about your federal tax return or tax account. It will be about a specific issue, such as changes to your account. It may ask you for more information. It could also explain that you owe tax and that you need to pay the amount that is due.

3. Each notice has specific instructions, so read it carefully. It will tell you what you need to do.

4. You may get a notice that states the IRS has made a change or correction to your tax return. If you do, review the information and compare it with your original return.

5. If you agree with the notice, you usually don’t need to reply unless it gives you other instructions or you need to make a payment.

6. If you do not agree with the notice, it’s important for you to respond. You should write a letter to explain why you disagree. Include any information and documents you want the IRS to consider. Mail your reply with the bottom tear-off portion of the notice. Send it to the address shown in the upper left-hand corner of the notice. Allow at least 30 days for a response.

7. You won’t need to call the IRS or visit an IRS office for most notices. If you do have questions, call the phone number in the upper right-hand corner of the notice. Have a copy of your tax return and the notice with you when you call. This will help the IRS answer your questions.

8. Always keep copies of any notices you receive with your other tax records.

9. Be alert for tax scams. The IRS sends letters and notices by mail. The IRS does not contact people by email or social media to ask for personal or financial information.

10. For more on this topic visit IRS.gov. Click on the link ‘Responding to a Notice’ at the bottom left of the home page. Also, see Publication 594, The IRS Collection Process. You can get it on IRS.gov/forms at any time.

Tips for Filing an Amended Return

Have you found that you made an error on your federal tax return? If so, you may need to file an amended return. Here are ten tips that can help you file.

1. Tax form to amend your return. Use Form 1040X, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, to correct your tax return. You must file a paper Form 1040X; it can’t be e-filed. You can get the form on IRS.gov/forms at any time. See the Form 1040X instructions for the address where you should mail your form.

2. Amend to correct errors. You should file an amended tax return to correct errors or make changes to your original tax return. For example, you should amend to change your filing status, or to correct your income, deductions or credits.

3. Don’t amend for math errors, missing forms. You normally don’t need to file an amended return to correct math errors. The IRS will automatically correct those for you. Also, do not file an amended return if you forgot to attach tax forms, such as a Form W-2 or a schedule. The IRS will mail you a request for them in most cases.

4. Most taxpayers don’t need to amend to correct Form 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace Statement, errors. Eligible taxpayers who filed a 2014 tax return and claimed a premium tax credit using incorrect information from either the federally-facilitated or a state-based Health Insurance Marketplace, generally do not have to file an amended return regardless of the nature of the error, even if additional taxes would be owed. The IRS may contact you to ask for a copy of your corrected Form 1095-A to verify the information.

5. Time limit to claim a refund. You usually have three years from the date you filed your original tax return to file Form 1040X to claim a refund. You can file it within two years from the date you paid the tax, if that date is later. That means the last day for most people to file a 2011 claim for a refund is April 15, 2015. See the Form 1040X instructions for special rules that apply to some claims.

6. Separate forms for each year. If you are amending more than one tax return, prepare a 1040X for each year. You should mail each year in separate envelopes. Note the tax year of the return you are amending at the top of Form 1040X. Check the form’s instructions for where to mail your return.

7. Attach other forms with changes. If you use other IRS forms or schedules to make changes, make sure to attach them to your Form 1040X.

8. When to file for second refund. If you are due a refund from your original return, wait to get that refund before filing Form 1040X to claim an additional refund. Amended returns take up to 16 weeks to process. You may spend your original refund while you wait for any additional refund.

9. Pay added tax as soon as you can. If you owe more tax, file your Form 1040X and pay the tax as soon as you can. This will stop added interest and penalties. Use IRS Direct Pay to pay your tax directly from your checking or savings account.

10. Track your amended return. You can track the status of your amended tax return three weeks after you file with ‘Where’s My Amended Return?’ This tool is on IRS.gov or by phone at 866-464-2050. It is available in English and in Spanish. The tool can track the status of an amended return for the current year and up to three years back. To use ‘Where’s My Amended Return?’ enter your taxpayer identification number, which is usually your Social Security number. You will also enter your date of birth and zip code. If you have filed amended returns for multiple years, you can check each year one at a time.

Need FAQ, Info or Help? Ask us about...

Local IRS Offices

York
2670 Industrial Hwy, York, PA 17402
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:30pm)
(717) 757-4977

Harrisburg
228 Walnut St, Harrisburg, PA 17101
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:00pm) (717) 777-9650

Lancaster
1720 Hempstead Rd, Lancaster, PA 17601
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:00pm)
(717) 291-1994