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From small business to non-profit (501(c)(3))… from new business to established… we handle the numbers so you can concentrate on the business!

AS of York caters to small business owners. Because you’re in business, you need the peace of mind that working with a trusted accounting firm like ASY can provide. At ASY, our goal is to help you thrive by providing the responsive, intelligent service you need. For over 30 years we have been contributing to the success of companies just like yours through our integrity, expertise, and client focus. Let us help you succeed by delegating your accounting and tax functions to us so you can focus on what you do best.

Experience the peace of mind that comes with working with ASY… contact us today.
(717) 757-5482  Text us at 717-759-4227

We offer year round Tax Service and electronic filing for both personal, corporate, and non-profit tax returns. Setting up a new business? Have questions? We can help. We offer a no charge consultation. Are you processing your own payroll? Are you being overcharged by a big National Payroll Company? We can help! We have been processing payroll for many local and National companies for over 30 years and we’ll take care of the headache of payroll taxes for you. Contact us for a quote on our payroll service today.

We’ll count the beans… you enjoy the coffee!

Whether you’re a new client or a familiar face, feel free to use our handy Tax Organizer to get you ready for the season.  PDF format.

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Announcement: Office Space Available

ASY has one office space available for lease at our office.  It is approximately 150 sqft.  This includes all utilities and Internet service. You would also have access to our spacious conference room for meetings. Contact David for more information.

 

 

Some popular tax benefits renewed for 2019; IRS Publication 17 Helps with 2019 Taxes

WASHINGTON ― The Internal Revenue Service reminds taxpayers that it is processing tax returns claiming benefits extended or changed by recent legislation. Most taxpayers can file when they are ready – and as they normally would – if they are eligible for one or more of these benefits and claim them on their 2019 federal tax return.

Taxpayers can get the most out of various tax benefits and get useful tips on preparing their 2019 federal income tax returns by consulting a free, comprehensive tax guide available on IRS.gov. Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax, features an in-depth look at on tax changes for 2019 including recent legislative changes and covers the general rules for filing a federal income tax return. It supplements the information contained in the tax form instruction booklet. This 277-page guide – available online as a PDF, HTML or eBook − also provides thousands of interactive links to help taxpayers quickly get answers to their questions.

Certain individual tax provisions extended

  • Deduction for above-the-line qualified tuition and related expenses claimed on Form 8917, Tuition and Fees Deduction
  • Deduction for mortgage insurance premiums treated as qualified residence interest, claimed on Schedule A, Itemized Deductions
  • Deduction for unreimbursed medical and dental expenses as the floor was lowered to 7.5% of adjusted gross income and claimed on Schedule A, Itemized Deductions
  • Credit for nonbusiness energy property claimed on Form 5695, Residential Energy Credits
  • Income exclusion for canceled debt for qualified principal residence indebtedness where the taxpayer defaulted on a mortgage that they took out to buy, build or substantially improve their main home claimed on Form 982, Reduction of Tax Attributes Due to Discharge of Indebtedness

Kiddie Tax modification

Recent legislation also modified the rules related to what’s commonly called the “Kiddie Tax” for certain children who may be able to calculate their tax based on the tax rate of the child’s parent. For tax year 2019, taxpayers can elect this alternative application for the tax on their unearned income by completing Form 8615, Tax for Certain Children Who Have Unearned Income, differently depending on their election. See the Form 8615 instructions for Part II Tax for more information. Taxpayers who make this election for 2019 must include a statement with their return specifying “election to modify tax of unearned income.” The statement can be made on the return (for example, on line 7 or at the top of Form 8615) or on an attachment filed with the return.

Disaster tax relief

Disaster tax relief was also enacted for those affected by certain Federally declared disasters. This includes an increased standard deduction based on qualified disaster losses and an election to use 2018 earned income to figure the 2019 earned income credit and additional child tax credit.

Certain taxpayers affected by federally declared disasters may be eligible for an automatic 60-Day extension for filing, paying their taxes, and other administrative deadlines.

Special rules may apply for taxpayers who received a distribution from an individual retirement arrangement, profit-sharing plan or retirement plan and their main home was in one of the federally declared disaster areas eligible for these special rules.

Amended returns

Three tax laws were enacted on Dec. 20, 2019. The Taxpayer Certainty and Disaster Tax Relief Act of 2019 extended certain previously expired tax benefits to 2018 and 2019 and provided tax relief for certain incidents federally declared as disasters in 2018 and 2019. The extended benefits and the disaster relief may now be claimed on 2018 and 2019 tax returns, by those who qualify.

The Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019 (the SECURE Act) made other changes, such as increasing the penalty for failing to file a tax return and modifying the rules related to the taxation of unearned income of certain minor children. The SECURE Act relaxed certain retirement plan contribution and distribution requirements beginning Jan. 1, 2020.

While the IRS has released the vast majority of tax year 2019 products, the IRS must also update 2018 tax products affected by these legislative changes. Taxpayers may have to file an amended return to claim these benefits on their 2018 return. See Form 1040-X, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, and its instructions at IRS.gov/Form1040X. Impacted 2018 forms, instructions and schedules are being revised to reflect the legislation enacted Dec. 20, 2019. The updated 2018 revisions will be posted to IRS.gov for taxpayers to file amended returns accurately.

The IRS works closely with tax professionals and partners in the tax return preparation and tax software industries to prepare for and address issues that may occur during the filing season. This ongoing collaboration ensures that taxpayers can continue to rely on the IRS, tax professionals and tax software programs when it’s time to file their returns. As always, filing electronically and choosing direct deposit is the fastest, most accurate and most convenient way to receive a tax refund.

Newly-revised IRS publication explains tax benefits for members of the military

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service has released its newly-revised tax guide, designed to help members of the military understand the many special tax benefits available to them under the law.

Publication 3, Armed Forces’ Tax Guide, now posted on IRS.gov, is packed with useful filing tips for any member of the military, including reservists and the National Guard, regardless of whether they are stationed in the U.S. or abroad.

Among other things, this free publication describes the provision allowing armed forces reservists to deduct their reservist-related travel expenses, regardless of whether they itemize their deductions. It also describes the moving expense deduction still available to active-duty members of the military in connection with a change of station.

The publication covers the special benefits available to those serving in a combat zone, including the full or partial exclusion of combat pay and special rules for determining the IRA contribution limit. Also included in this publication are special rules for figuring the Earned Income Tax Credit for low-and moderate-income workers and families and the extended deadlines available for filing returns, paying taxes and claiming refunds.

To view or download this free publication, visit IRS.gov/pub3.

More resources:

Things taxpayers should remember when searching for a tax preparer

The tax filing season is upon us, and many people will be looking for someone to help them file a tax return. These taxpayers should choose their tax return preparer wisely. 

This is because it’s ultimately the taxpayer who is responsible for all the information on their income tax return. It’s important for people to remember that this is true no matter who prepares the return. Here are some tips for folks to remember when selecting a preparer. Taxpayers should:

Check the preparer’s qualifications. People can use the IRS Directory of Federal Tax Return Preparers with Credentials and Select Qualifications. This tool helps taxpayers find a tax return preparer with specific qualifications. The directory is a searchable and sortable listing of preparers.

Check the preparer’s history. Taxpayers can ask the local Better Business Bureau about the preparer. Check for disciplinary actions and the license status for credentialed preparers. There are some additional organizations to check for specific types of preparers:

  • Enrolled Agents: Go to the verify enrolled agent status page on IRS.gov.
  • Certified Public Accountants: Check with the State Board of Accountancy.
  • Attorneys: Check with the State Bar Association.

Ask about service fees. People should avoid preparers who base fees on a percentage of the refund or who boast bigger refunds than their competition.

Ask to e-file. The quickest way for taxpayers to get their refund is to electronically file their federal tax return and use direct deposit.

Make sure the preparer is available. Taxpayers may want to contact their preparer after this year’s April 15 due date. People should avoid fly-by-night preparers.

Provide records and receipts. Good preparers will ask to see a taxpayer’s records and receipts. They’ll ask questions to figure things like the total income, tax deductions and credits.

Never sign a blank return. Taxpayers should not use a tax preparer who asks them to sign a blank tax form.

Review before signing. Before signing a tax return, the taxpayer should review it. They should ask questions if something is not clear. Taxpayers should feel comfortable with the accuracy of their return before they sign it.

Review details about any refund. Taxpayers should make sure that their refund goes directly to them – not to the preparer’s bank account. The taxpayer should review the routing and bank account number on the completed return.

Ensure the preparer signs and includes their PTIN. All paid tax preparers must have a Preparer Tax Identification Number. By law, paid preparers must sign returns and include their PTIN.

Report abusive tax preparers to the IRS. Most tax return preparers are honest and provide great service to their clients. However, some preparers are dishonest. People can report abusive tax preparers and suspected tax fraud to the IRS. Use Form 14157, Complaint: Tax Return Preparer.

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IRS updates guidance on business expense deductions for meals and entertainment

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service issued proposed regulations on the business expense deduction for meals and entertainment following changes made by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA).

The 2017 TCJA eliminated the deduction for any expenses related to activities generally considered entertainment, amusement or recreation. It also limited the deduction for expenses related to food and beverages provided by employers to their employees.

These proposed regulations address the elimination of the deduction for expenditures related to entertainment, amusement or recreation activities and provide guidance to determine whether an activity is considered to be entertainment. The proposed regulations also address the limitation on the deduction of food and beverage expenses.

The proposed regulations affect taxpayers who pay or incur expenses for meals or entertainment. These proposed regulations generally follow Notice 2018-76, issued on Oct. 15, 2018, which provided transitional guidance on the deductibility of expenses for certain business meals.

Taxpayers affected by this change and other interested parties may submit comments on the proposed regulations. The IRS will hold a public hearing on these proposed regulations on April 7, 2020.

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2670 Industrial Hwy, York, PA 17402
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NATP

National Association of Tax Professionals