ASY are Small Business Accountants that treat me like family.

Bookkeeping • Payroll • Tax Preparation • Government Correspondence

From small business to non-profit (501(c)(3))… from new business to established… we handle the numbers so you can concentrate on the business!

AS of York caters to small business owners. Because you’re in business, you need the peace of mind that working with a trusted accounting firm like ASY can provide. At ASY, our goal is to help you thrive by providing the responsive, intelligent service you need. For over 30 years we have been contributing to the success of companies just like yours through our integrity, expertise, and client focus. Let us help you succeed by delegating your accounting and tax functions to us so you can focus on what you do best.

Experience the peace of mind that comes with working with ASY… contact us today.
(717) 757-5482  Text us at 717-759-4227

We offer year round Tax Service and electronic filing for both personal, corporate, and non-profit tax returns. Setting up a new business? Have questions? We can help. We offer a no charge consultation. Are you processing your own payroll? Are you being overcharged by a big National Payroll Company? We can help! We have been processing payroll for many local and National companies for over 30 years and we’ll take care of the headache of payroll taxes for you. Contact us for a quote on our payroll service today.

We’ll count the beans… you enjoy the coffee!

Whether you’re a new client or a familiar face, feel free to use our handy Tax Organizer to get you ready for the season.  PDF format.

NEW Now you can Schedule your tax appointment online

Click the links below to get the status of your refund

Federal — Where is My Federal RefundWhere’s My Federal Amended Return Pay Your Bill Online
Pennsylvania — Where’s My PA RefundWhere is my Pa Property Tax Rebate

Announcement: Office Space Available

ASY has one office space available for lease at our office.  It is approximately 150 sqft.  This includes all utilities and Internet service. You would also have access to our spacious conference room for meetings. Contact David for more information.

 

 

Meals and Entertainment

Inside This Issue


Here is a video tax tip from the IRS: 

Meals and Entertainment English | Spanish | ASL

Subscribe today: The IRS YouTube channels provide short, informative videos on various tax related topics in English, Spanish and ASL.

Using strong password is a strong defense against identity thieves

Two things taxpayers can do to prevent themselves from identity theft is to use strong passwords and keep those passwords secure.

While many people use fingerprint or facial recognition technology to protect their devices, sometimes it’s still necessary to use a password. In recent years, cybersecurity experts’ recommendations on what constitutes a strong password has changed. With that in mind, here are four tips for building a better password:

  • Use word phrases that are easy to remember rather than random letters, characters and numbers that cannot be easily recalled.
  • Use a minimum of eight characters; longer is better.
  • Use a combination of letters, numbers and symbols, i.e., XYZ, 567, !@#.
  • Avoid personal information or common passwords.

Writing strong passwords isn’t the only way to keep data secure. Here are a few more tips for folks to remember. People should:

  • Change default and temporary passwords that come with accounts or devices.
  • Not reuse passwords. Rather use a completely different password for every account and device.
  • Give a password a total makeover when changing it. For example, simply changing Bgood!17 to Bgood!18 is not good enough.
  • Not use email addresses as usernames, if that’s an option.
  • Store any password list in a secure location, such as a safe or locked file cabinet.
  • Not disclose passwords to anyone for any reason.
  • Use a password manager program to track passwords if you have numerous accounts.

Whenever it is an option for a password-protected account, users also should opt for a multi-factor authentication process. Many email providers, financial institutions and social media sites now offer customers two-factor authentication protections. Two-factor authentication helps by adding an extra layer of protection. Often two-factor authentication means the returning user must first enter credentials like a username and password. Then they must do another step, such as entering a security code texted to a mobile phone

Interest rates remain the same for the first quarter of 2020

WASHINGTON —The Internal Revenue Service today announced that interest rates will remain the same for the calendar quarter beginning Jan. 1, 2020.  The rates will be:  

  • 5% for overpayments [4% in the case of a corporation];
  • 2.5% for the portion of a corporate overpayment exceeding $10,000;
  • 5% for underpayments; and
  • 7% for large corporate underpayments. 

Under the Internal Revenue Code, the rate of interest is determined on a quarterly basis. For taxpayers other than corporations, the overpayment and underpayment rate is the federal short-term rate plus 3 percentage points. 

Generally, in the case of a corporation, the underpayment rate is the federal short-term rate plus 3 percentage points and the overpayment rate is the federal short-term rate plus 2 percentage points. The rate for large corporate underpayments is the federal short-term rate plus 5 percentage points. The rate on the portion of a corporate overpayment of tax exceeding $10,000 for a taxable period is the federal short-term rate plus one-half (0.5) of a percentage point.

The interest rates announced today are computed from the federal short-term rate determined during Oct. 2019, to take effect Nov. 1, 2019, based on daily compounding.

Revenue Ruling 2019-28, announcing the rates of interest, is attached and will appear in Internal Revenue Bulletin 2019-52, dated Dec. 23, 2019.

National Tax Security Awareness Week, Day 4: IRS, Security Summit warns business owners about being targets for identity thieves

WASHINGTON – Amid threats from cybercriminals, the IRS, state tax agencies and the tax industry urged employers large and small to step up cybersecurity protections against business identity theft.

Identity thieves are displaying a sophisticated knowledge of the tax code and industry filing practices as they attempt to obtain valuable data to help file fraudulent returns. To address this and protect taxpayers and their business returns, the IRS has taken steps to identify and prevent business identity theft.

“As the IRS and the Security Summit partners have strengthened our protections against tax-related identity theft, cybercriminals increasingly look for other places to find data to file fraudulent returns,” said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig. “We urge businesses to protect their data and watch out for warning signs that could be indicators of identity theft or fraudulent filings.”

Awareness about business identity theft is one in a series of tips offered by the Internal Revenue Service, state tax agencies and tax industry, which partner as the Security Summit to protect taxpayers. The Security Summit is marking its fourth National Tax Security Awareness Week by urging employers that they, too, can be victims of identity theft.

The week continues through tomorrow with a series of special educational efforts taking place at more than 25 partner events across the country to raise awareness about protecting taxpayers and tax professionals from identity theft. The week includes special social media efforts on platforms including Twitter and Instagram, including a special Twitter chat on @IRSnews and #TaxSecurity today.

As with fraudulent individual returns, there are certain signs that may indicate identity theft has occurred to businesses. Business, partnerships and estate and trust filers should be alert to potential identity theft and contact the IRS if they experience any of these issues:

  • Extension to file requests are rejected because a tax return with the Employer Identification Number (EIN) or Social Security number (SSN) is already on file.
  • An e-filed return is rejected because of a duplicate EIN or SSN is already on file with the IRS.
  • An unexpected receipt of a tax transcript or IRS notice that doesn’t correspond to anything submitted by the filer.
  • Failure to receive expected and routine correspondence from the IRS because the thief has changed the address.

For several years, the IRS has taken steps to help protect Form 1120-series filers, and the Security Summit effort is part of that. For example, tax software products now share many data elements with the IRS and state tax agencies. These data elements assist the IRS and states to identify suspicious tax returns and to reduce the impact to legitimate filers. This will allow legitimate returns to be processed as usual.

The IRS also now asks tax professionals preparing business-related returns to step up the “trusted customer” procedures. Tax preparation software for business-related returns asks the following questions to help protect the business filer:

  • The name and SSN of the company executive authorized to sign the corporate tax return, including Form 1065. Is this person authorized to sign the return?
  • Payment history – Were estimated tax payments made?
  • Total income amount from prior-year filings.
  • Parent company information – Is there a parent company? If yes, the name?
  • Additional information based on deductions claimed.
  • Filing history.

The IRS, state tax agencies and tax industry work in partnership as the Security Summit to help protect taxpayers from identity theft and refund fraud. This is the fourth in a week-long series of tips to raise awareness about identity theft. See IRS.gov/SecuritySummit for details.

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NATP

National Association of Tax Professionals