ASY are Small Business Accountants that treat me like family.

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From small business to non-profit (501(c)(3))… from new business to established… we handle the numbers so you can concentrate on the business!

AS of York caters to small business owners. Because you’re in business, you need the peace of mind that working with a trusted accounting firm like ASY can provide. At ASY, our goal is to help you thrive by providing the responsive, intelligent service you need. For over 34 years we have been contributing to the success of companies just like yours through our integrity, expertise, and client focus. Let us help you succeed by delegating your accounting and tax functions to us so you can focus on what you do best.

Experience the peace of mind that comes with working with ASY… contact us today.                Visit us on Facebook
(717) 757-5482  Text us at 717-759-4227

We offer year round Tax Service and electronic filing for both personal, corporate, and non-profit tax returns. Setting up a new business? Have questions? We can help. We offer a no charge consultation. Are you processing your own payroll? Are you being overcharged by a big National Payroll Company? We can help! We have been processing payroll for many local and National companies for over 34 years and we’ll take care of the headache of payroll taxes for you. Contact us for a quote on our payroll service today.

We’ll count the beans… you enjoy the coffee!

Whether you’re a new client or a familiar face, feel free to use our handy Tax Organizer to get you ready for the season.  PDF format.
Schedule your tax appointment online 

Due to Covid-19 we are encouraging our clients to drop off their taxes or upload them to their smart Vault Portal. If you would like to schedule a face to face meeting please call the office for an appointment or click to above link to schedule online.

For more resources on Covid-19 follow this link Including updating bank info for a stimulus payment or applying for an SBA loan.

Click the links below to get the status of your refund

Federal — Where is My Federal RefundWhere’s My Federal Amended Return Pay Your Bill Online
Pennsylvania — Where’s My PA RefundWhere is my Pa Property Tax Rebate

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Announcement: COVID-19 Alert and ASY

ASY continues to monitor information from health officials about the COVID-19, and are working to maintain a safe work environment to protect the health and well-being of our staff and Clients. We have increased the frequency of deep cleanings in our office and wipe every surface used multiple times daily. If you are concerned about coming to our office to get your taxes prepared you may drop off your tax information at our front desk or upload your info to Smart Vault, our secure online portal. If you need assistance or forgot your login feel free to send us a txt or call us at 717-759-4227 and we will be glad to help you. Together we shall get thru this.

For more resources about Covid-19 follow this link


Homeownership and taxes: Things taxpayers should consider when selling a house

It’s important for taxpayers to understand how selling their home may affect their tax return. When filing their taxes, they may qualify to exclude all or part of any gain from the sale from their income.

Here are some key things homeowners should consider when selling a home:

Ownership and use
To claim the exclusion, the taxpayer must meet ownership and use tests. During a five-year period ending on the date of the sale, the homeowner must have owned the home and lived in it as their main home for at least two years.

Gains
Taxpayers who sell their main home and have a gain from the sale may be able to exclude up to $250,000 of that gain from their income. Taxpayers who file a joint return with their spouse may be able to exclude up to $500,000. Homeowners excluding all the gain do not need to report the sale on their tax return.

Losses
Some taxpayers experience a loss when their main home sells for less than what they paid for it. This loss is not deductible.

Multiple homes
Taxpayers who own more than one home can only exclude the gain on the sale of their main home. They must pay taxes on the gain from selling any other home.

Reported sale
Taxpayers who don’t qualify to exclude all the taxable gain from their income must report the gain from the sale of their home when they file their tax return. Anyone who chooses not to claim the exclusion must report the taxable gain on their tax return. Taxpayers who receive Form 1099-S, Proceeds from Real Estate Transactions must report the sale on their tax return even if they have no taxable gain.

Possible exceptions
There are exceptions to these rules for some individuals, including persons with a disability, certain members of the military, intelligence community and Peace Corps workers.

Worksheets
Worksheets included in Publication 523Selling Your Home can help taxpayers figure the adjusted basis of the home sold, the gain or loss on the sale and the excluded gain on the sale.

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Checking withholding can help taxpayers decide if they need to give their employer a new W-4

All taxpayers should review their federal withholding each year to make sure they’re not having too little or too much tax withheld.

Employees, retirees and self-employed individuals can use the IRS Tax Withholding Estimator to help decide if they should make a change to their withholding. This online tool guides users, step-by-step through the process of checking their withholding, and provides withholding recommendations to help aim for their desired refund amount when they file next year. Taxpayers can check with their employer to update their withholding or submit a new Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Certificate.

Adjustments to withholding
Individuals should generally increase withholding if they hold more than one job at a time or have income from sources not subject to withholding. If they don’t make any changes, they will likely owe additional tax and possibly penalties when filing their tax return.

Individuals should generally decrease their withholding if they qualify for income tax credits or deductions other than the basic standard deduction.

Either way, those who need to adjust their withholding must prepare a new Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Certificate. They need to submit the new Form W-4 to their employer as soon as possible since withholding occurs throughout the year.

Individuals who should check their withholding include those:

  • whose spouse is an employee
  • who are working two or more jobs at the same time or who only work for part of the year
  • who claim credits such as the child tax credit
  • with dependents age 17 or older
  • who itemized deductions on prior year returns
  • with high incomes and more complex tax returns
  • with large tax refunds or large tax bills for last year

Tax Withholding Estimator benefits
The IRS Tax Withholding Estimator can help taxpayers:

  • determine if they should complete a new Form W-4.
  • know what information to put on a new Form W-4.
  • save time because the tool completes the form worksheets.

Taxpayers should prepare before using the Tax Withholding Estimator by having their most recent pay statements, information for other income sources and their most recent income tax return. The tool does not ask for sensitive information such as name, Social Security number, address, or bank account numbers.

State or local withholding
Some individuals might also need to adjust their state or local withholding. They can contact their state’s department of revenue to learn more.

More information:
Video: How to Use the IRS Withholding Estimator
Tax Withholding Estimator FAQs
Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax

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IRS working to help those without a permanent address get benefits including stimulus payments and tax credits

While the third round of Economic Impact Payments continue to be made automatically to most people, the IRS can’t issue a payment to eligible Americans when information about them isn’t available in the tax agency’s systems.

Economic Impact Payments, also known as stimulus payments, are different from most other tax benefits.

People don’t need a permanent address, a bank account or even a job to get these payments. Individuals may qualify for this money if they have a Social Security number and are not being supported by someone else who can claim them as a dependent.

Eligible people who haven’t received these payments should file a 2020 tax return, even if they don’t usually file. This will give the IRS information needed to send them a payment. Those experiencing homelessness may list the address of a friend, relative or trusted service provider, such as a shelter, drop-in day center or transitional housing program, on their tax return.

Those who missed either of the first two payments can still get this money by filing a 2020 tax return and claiming the recovery rebate credit. Filing a 2020 tax return is the only way, eligible people can receive the money from the first or second payments now. Most people can use IRS Free File to provide very basic information. There’s even a special section on IRS.gov that can help: Claiming the 2020 recovery rebate credit if you aren’t required to file a tax return.

The credit will be included in the filer’s tax refund. The IRS will send any third EIP amount they are eligible for separately after their return has been processed. Using IRS Free File to file a tax return and choosing direct deposit is the quickest and safest way to get a refund.

The American Rescue Plan expands EITC and the child tax credit benefits for the 2021 tax year. Some people will be able to get advance payments of the child tax credit later this year. There is nothing those who qualify need to do at this point other than file a 2020 tax return.

Options for those without a bank account People who don’t have a bank account should visit the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation website for details on opening an account online or use the FDIC’s BankFind tool to locate an FDIC-insured bank.

BankOn, American Bankers Association, Independent Community Bankers of America, National Credit Union Administration have lists of banks and credit unions that can open an account online. Veterans, can visit the Veterans Benefits Banking Program for financial services at participating banks.

Many reloadable prepaid cards or mobile payment apps also have account and routing numbers that individuals can provide to the IRS to get their payments.

Individuals experiencing homelessness can also receive the EITC For people experiencing homelessness who have a job, filing a tax return often carries a bonus — getting a refund based on various tax benefits, especially the earned income tax credit for low-and moderate-income workers and working families.

To get the credit, federal law requires that a worker live in the U.S. for more than half of the year and meet other requirements. This means living in a home in any of the 50 states or the District of Columbia. Therefore, individuals experiencing homelessness, including those who stay at one or more homeless shelters, can meet that requirement.

Because it’s a refundable credit, those who qualify and claim the credit could pay less federal tax, no tax, or even get a tax refund. The amount varies depending on the worker’s income, marital status, and other factors.

To find out if they’re eligible, people can use the EITC Assistant on IRS.gov. It’s available in both English and Spanish.

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What someone should do if they missed the May 17 deadline to file and pay taxes

The federal income tax deadline has passed for most individual taxpayers. However, some haven’t filed their 2020 tax returns or paid their tax due.

 

If an individual taxpayer is owed a refund, there’s no penalty for filing late. On the other hand, tax owed and not paid by May 17, 2021 is subject to penalties and interest.

 

Anyone who didn’t file and owes tax should file a return as soon as they can and pay as much as they can to reduce penalties and interest. Electronic filing options, including IRS Free File, are still available on IRS.gov through October 15, 2021, to prepare and file returns electronically.

 

Taxpayers should then review their payment options. The IRS has information for taxpayers who can’t pay taxes they owe.

 

Some taxpayers may have extra time to file their tax returns and pay any taxes due. This includes some disaster victims, taxpayers living overseas, certain military service members and eligible support personnel in combat zones.

 

Filing soon is very important because the late-filing and late-payment penalties on unpaid taxes add up quickly. However, in some cases, a taxpayer filing after the deadline may qualify for penalty relief. For those charged a penalty, they may contact the IRS by calling the number on their notice and explain why they couldn’t file and pay on time.

 

Taxpayers who have a history of filing and paying on time often qualify for administrative penalty relief. A taxpayer usually qualifies if they have filed and paid timely for the past three years and meet other requirements. For details, taxpayers should visit the first-time penalty abatement page on IRS.gov.

 

State filing and payment deadlines may be different from the federal deadline. A list of state tax division websites is available through the Federation of Tax Administrators.

 

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Local IRS Offices

York
2670 Industrial Hwy, York, PA 17402
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:30pm)
(717) 757-4977

Harrisburg
228 Walnut St, Harrisburg, PA 17101
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:00pm) (717) 777-9650

Lancaster
1720 Hempstead Rd, Lancaster, PA 17601
Monday-Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm
(Closed for lunch 12:30pm - 1:00pm)
(717) 291-1994










NATP

National Association of Tax Professionals